Mason Weis

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CRAP — Part 2 Repetition

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Hey everyone! Sorry for the lack of posts last week. Although I’m a bit late, here’s the second part of my CRAP series as promised.

Last week, we went over the importance of effectively using contrast in design. While contrast alone can certainly heighten any given design, it is only one of the principles covered by CRAP. The second of these principles is, as you might have guessed from the title of this post, repetition.

100serie by Heydays Design Agency

100serie by Heydays Design Agency

Let’s look at this design. This “multi-print” work features a repeating pattern of zeroes. But what exactly does it do to heighten the design overall? First and foremost, I’d argue that it adds a general sense of cohesion to the piece. This repeating pattern connects the separate elements into something whole. What’s more, however, this consistency adds a certain “visual rhythm” to the piece. The repeating zeroes/repeating alignment motif create a zig-zag that makes the work interesting and visually striking.

Consider a similar piece that had a series of dissimilar zeroes strewn about the page. None of them are the same font or color and there’s no regard for the way in which they’re placed. Their existence on the page is totally random. The design itself becomes much more cacophonous and hard to follow. It would definitely be much less pleasant to look at. While this example is an extreme, I think my point still gets across.

Here are some more examples of repetition:

Slanted Magazine #27 - Portugal by Slanted Publishers -- Pay attention to the repetition on this cover. Where is there a lack of repetition? The top. Why? Maybe because that makes the top of the cover stand out from the rest of the design which, in turn, draws focus to it.

Slanted Magazine #27 - Portugal by Slanted Publishers -- Pay attention to the repetition on this cover. Where is there a lack of repetition? The top. Why? Maybe because that makes the top of the cover stand out from the rest of the design which, in turn, draws focus to it.

BBDO by Casey Martin -- Take a look at not only the repeating lines in these posters, but also the repetition in color scheme, and execution. This is a repetition dream right here.

BBDO by Casey Martin -- Take a look at not only the repeating lines in these posters, but also the repetition in color scheme, and execution. This is a repetition dream right here.

Repetition is also important to consider for things such as branding. When creating an effective style for a brand, things have to be consistent. For example, imagine that everything Adobe puts its logo on looks like it normally does except for when it updates flash sometimes. Every now and again, the logo looks like this on the download page for flash.

That throws the entire Adobe brand out of whack. By making sure the logo looks the same (or at least follows very similar guidelines) on everything, Adobe makes their brand look coherent and fully put-together.

Repetition is a key aspect of design. It ties everything together and ensures that designs feel whole. Like contrast, repetition is an important thing that any good designer will keep in mind.

Next week, I’ll be covering the third CRAP principle: Alignment!

 

Until next time!

Mason Weis